roswell crash
If you haven't heard of Project Mogul, you probably are not alone. The famous Roswell incident, which claims and mythologizes that a UFO crashed on a farmer's ranch in New Mexico, has etched its way into global pop culture... but what if it is nothing more than a myth that was sensationalized by media at the time?

More researchers are coming to the realization that the famous Roswell UFO may have been nothing more than a top secret spy balloon that was being tested to spy on the Soviet Union during the Cold War. The US government's attempts to rapidly cover up the incident may have only added to the sensational media coverage at the time.

Sensationalized news coverage and "fake news" are nothing new in the 21st Century, but they were really nothing new in the 1940s, 1950s or the 1960s. The radio panic created by Orson Welles' fictionalized alien invasion never really happened: the panic was fake. Media at the time sensationalized the effects and reactions to Welles' War Of The Worlds broadcast, creating a myth that persists even today. You can read more about that here.
So if we are reluctant to believe news and media today, why are we so eager to believe the same newspapers and media that sensationalized the War Of The Words panic many decades ago?

Good question.

After the Roswell incident, newspapers across America sensationalized the idea that an alien spacecraft from another world had crashed on a farmer's ranch. To this day, the Roswell incident has embedded itself in pop culture as a modern American myth. However, photos of the incident add credence to the idea that the crashed vehicle may have, in fact, been a spy balloon made of a type of aluminum. 



We have to ask ourselves, does the material shown in these authentic photos from the Roswell incident look like something an advanced civilization would build their anti-gravity ships with?

Mythology states that the aluminum-like material would unfold itself and return itself to its pristine form after being crushed and crumpled, however, no photographic or film evidence has ever proven that to be true. All we are left with is a story based on one, single eyewitness account. That doesn't leave us much to work with. 

What we do have is several reports and documents proving a project conducted by the US government was, indeed, testing top secret spy balloons in New Mexico and Nevada at the exact time of the Roswell incident. The top secret project was called Project Mogul.

During the Cold War, the US government was experimenting with balloons that could reach maximum heights within the Earth's atmosphere in order to spy on enemies. One of these balloons may have crashed in New Mexico, causing a cover-up that would make newspapers and media go insane. 

Author Sam Kean was the one who made the project known to Americans in a book called, Caesar's Last Breath: Decoding The Secrets Of The Air Around Us.

In his book, Kean writes:

Ewing was pretty optimistic about Project Mogul at first, but when he began running tests at Alamogordo Army Air Field in New Mexico in early 1947, he ran into several problems. One involved keeping balloons at a constant altitude, since sunlight warmed the balloon envelope. This in turn warmed the gas inside and caused the balloon to rise out of the sound channel. Ewing’s team countered this tendency by using transparent balloons, which allowed sunlight to stream through. (Ewing ordered them from the same company that made the first balloon figures for the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. When his assistants saw the transparent balloons, they immediately thought of something else: titanic condoms.)

Another problem involved tracking the balloons, since they wandered aimlessly with the wind. Ewing proposed tracking them with radar, but the equipment at Alamogordo had trouble finding these tiny targets at high altitudes. So the scientists decided to send up not one but thirty balloons at once; they were yoked together in a column sixty-five stories tall, more than twice the height of the Statue of Liberty. They also added radar reflectors to the balloon column, metal surfaces that helped redirect the radar waves back toward the ground. Each reflector looked something like a metallic box kite, and Project Mogul in fact contracted with a toy company to make them. Because the scientists didn’t care about aesthetics, the toy company bound the reflectors together with Elmer’s glue and tape. And because tape was scarce due to lingering wartime shortages, the company dipped into a stock of wacky novelty tape it had on hand — tape covered in purple, squiggly hieroglyphics.

This novelty tape containing bizarre hieroglyphics helps explain other eyewitness accounts of the wreckage containing some sort of "alien language". The US government was being a bit sloppy with these massive, reflective spy balloons that were reported to be almost the size of the Statue Of Liberty, but much of Project Mogul was in its early stages at the time of the Roswell incident. 

In Kean's book, the reflective material of the "spacecraft", as well as its size and bizarre hieroglyphs all have an explanation that helps put the entire Roswell incident into perspective. Everything from the cover-up to the pieces of wreckage make sense when we consider the circumstances. Government scientists were working with what they had and dealing with an enemy abroad that could have the capability to obliterate the entire United States Of America with its nuclear arsenal... if such an espionage project were to make public headlines. 

Rather than have the Soviets find out about a secret spy balloon, it was more safe to let the media ignite the public imagination about what happened at Roswell.

You be the judge. 
      May 2019 
roswell, incident, mogul, project, secret, new mexico, kean, balloon, myth, sensationalized, roswell, incident, mogul, project, secret, new mexico, kean, balloon, myth, sensationalized, roswell, incident, mogul, project, secret, new mexico, kean, balloon, myth, sensationalized, roswell, incident, mogul, project, secret, new mexico, kean, balloon, myth, sensationalized, roswell, incident, mogul, project, secret, new mexico, kean, balloon, myth, sensationalized, roswell, incident, mogul, project, secret, new mexico, kean, balloon, myth, sensationalized, roswell, incident, mogul, project, secret, new mexico, kean, balloon, myth, sensationalized